Tag: silt fencing

A silt fence, sometimes (misleadingly) called a “filter fence,” is a temporary sediment control device used on construction sites to protect water quality in nearby streams, rivers, lakes and seas from sediment (loose soil) in stormwater runoff. Silt fences are widely used on construction sites in North America and elsewhere, due to their low cost and simple design. However, their effectiveness in controlling sediment can be limited, due to problems with poor installation, proper placement, and/or inadequate maintenance.

Project Profile: Southampton Solar Project

Project Profile: Southampton Solar Project

THE SOUTHAMPTON SOLAR PROJECT consists of solar arrays in six locations in Southampton County, VA, covering approximately 1,400 acres. Although the arrays are on separate parcels and are not contiguous, they are in the same general area of the county; the largest parcel, designated Pod A, covers 663 acres, and

Hydroseeding With Native Seed Mix for Erosion Control

Hydroseeding With Native Seed Mix for Erosion Control

Native seed mix is becoming increasingly popular in hydroseeding projects.  When native grasses and plants spring up after a successful hydroseeding project, the plants blend in with neighboring vegetation. The success of any erosion control project depends on many factors, including site, budget, and season. In this article we’ll examine two successful projects where native seed mixes

Hydroseeding: Protecting the Soil and the Future

Hydroseeding: Protecting the Soil and the Future

Timing hydroseeding correctly requires balance and planning. Today, contractors like Brian Young, general manager of Fox Erosion Control & Landscape Inc. based in Clackamas, OR, are fast approaching the last seeding window of the year as set for his region by the Oregon Department of Transportation: September 1 through October

Cofferdams Control Water While Trenching Under a River

Cofferdams Control Water While Trenching Under a River

In the summer of 2014, Midwestern Contractors was involved with laying two high-pressure gas transmission lines across the DuPage River, located in the western suburbs of Chicago.

“In this project, we had to lay two 18- or 20-inch lines across the river,” explains Mike Purpura, the company’s director of business development.

Keeping the Waters Clear

Keeping the Waters Clear

Airplane Safety and Aquatic Protection:
Any work taking place in and around Boston Harbor attracts a lot of attention from local, state, and federal agencies. As a result, when the Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport) came to the realization that runway safety area work at Boston’s Logan International Airport was necessary

Keeping the Waters Clear

Keeping the Waters Clear

Airplane Safety and Aquatic Protection Any work taking place in and around Boston Harbor attracts a lot of attention from local, state, and federal agencies. As a result, when the Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport) came to the realization that runway safety area work at Boston’s Logan International Airport was necessary

Finding a Strategy for Sediment

Finding a Strategy for Sediment

Many things are dictating the choices of temporary sediment control these days: stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) compliance and other environmental concerns, product strength, ease of installation, productivity concerns, minimal maintenance, reduced labor costs, and other budgetary factors. While temporary sediment control may consist of a BMP used on a

Silt Fence and Wattles Stay the Course

Silt Fence and Wattles Stay the Course

Classic performers in any field remain popular because they serve a purpose and they execute it well. Take, for example, sediment control. While many materials used for this objective on project sites around the globe have become more environmentally sensitive and more effective regarding their intended purpose in recent years,

Silt Fence and Wattles Stay the Course – Part 2

Silt Fence and Wattles Stay the Course – Part 2

Replacing a Water Main
Another site that combines a variety of techniques, including silt fencing and wattles, is an ongoing water main instillation project at Fort Belvoir military base in Virginia.

Work at the 80,000-acre site began in 2010, stopped briefly, and resumed in August 2011. Sediment control at the site where

Silt Fence and Wattles Stay the Course – Part 1

Silt Fence and Wattles Stay the Course – Part 1

These standards of the industry remain viable, versatile, and classic.

Classic performers in any field remain popular because they serve a purpose and they execute it well. Take, for example, sediment control. While many materials used for this objective on project sites around the globe have become more environmentally sensitive and

Enter Your Log In Credentials
×