Tag: soil and water

Soils can process and contain considerable amounts of water. They can take in water, and will keep doing so until they are full, or until the rate at which they can transmit water into and through the pores is exceeded. Some of this water will steadily drain through the soil (via gravity) and end up in the waterways and streams, but much of it will be retained, away from the influence of gravity, for use of plants and other organisms to contribute to land productivity and soil health.

Stormwater Monitoring

Stormwater Monitoring

The most dramatic and identifying characteristic of water is that it is always moving. Even so-called standing water is never completely static; it’s either being drawn by gravity to seep down into the earth or being agitated by warmth at the surface to rise into the air as a vapor.

Dead in the Water

Dead in the Water

What happens when we die? Allow me to rephrase: what happens to our bodies when we die?

The earth is, generally, a great filter. Slowing down and infiltrating stormwater reduces pollutants and recharges aquifers and groundwater supplies. But as we know, anything that goes in or on the ground has

Every Job and Every Day Are Different

Every Job and Every Day Are Different

The hydroseeding machine and the crew may be the same as last month or last year, but every job is different. Each project has its own variables—tricky slopes, tight timelines, rain that just won’t quit, and more. Finding the right combination of seeds, mulch, and other ingredients so that soil

Making Every Drop Count

Making Every Drop Count

The most dramatic and identifying characteristic of water is that it is always moving. Even so-called standing water is never completely static; it’s either being drawn by gravity to seep down into the earth or being agitated by warmth at the surface to rise into the air as a vapor.

Reader Profile: John Whittingham

Reader Profile: John Whittingham

Rills and gullies on disturbed landscapes are as intriguing as they are destructive, notes John Whittingham. Accelerated soil loss resulting from human activities has always captivated Whittingham’s interest. Growing up in Colorado Springs, CO, during the 1960s and 1970s, Whittingham was often found hiking through deep ravines caused by construction-site

Reader Profile: Bill O’Brien

Reader Profile: Bill O’Brien

The list of services performed by Bill O’Brien’s company, NextGen Engineering in California and Arizona, reads like an encyclopedia of erosion control techniques. O’Brien, P.E., CFM, QSD, is not only passionate about doing diversified work, but also about paying it forward in training the next generation of water resource practitioners,

Erosion Control Devices

Erosion Control Devices

No one knows when it happened: some would say perhaps it made no sound, or maybe no one was listening, but something changed in the watershed upstream of several properties in a Noblesville, IN, subdivision. Suddenly, the slope of a streambank in a neighborhood backyard began wasting away.

Rolling Back Erosion With Tubes, Logs, and Socks

Rolling Back Erosion With Tubes, Logs, and Socks

No one knows when it happened: some would say perhaps it made no sound, or maybe no one was listening, but something changed in the watershed upstream of several properties in a Noblesville, IN, subdivision. Suddenly, the slope of a streambank in a neighborhood backyard began wasting away.

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