Tag: stormwater pond

A stormwater management pond is an artificial pond that is designed to collect and retain urban stormwater.[1] They are frequently built into urban areas in North America to also retain sediments and other materials.
In urban areas, impervious surfaces (roofs, roads) reduce the time spent by rainfall before entering into the stormwater drainage system. If left unchecked, this will cause widespread flooding downstream.

Protecting Puget Sound

Protecting Puget Sound

A common purpose runs through many, likely most, stormwater projects in the greater Seattle area and other western Washington cities, certainly in the projects profiled in this story.

Integrating Land-Use Changes for Future Stormwater Projects

Integrating Land-Use Changes for Future Stormwater Projects

In early July 2013, 2 inches of rain fell within a 45-minute period at the city-owned Lebanon Municipal Airport in Lebanon, NH. This storm created devastation for the city and the airport, with multiple slope failures and roadway washouts. In all, 3.47 inches of rain fell during the 10-year storm

StormCon Program

StormCon Program

StormCon 2017, the Surface Water Quality Conference & Expo, will take place August 27–31 in Bellevue, WA, at the Meydenbauer Convention Center and Hyatt Regency Hotel. The conference features more than 130 presentations in six conference tracks, plus panel discussions and a tour of local stormwater facilities.
The schedule of presentations

What’s Hot in Modeling Software

What’s Hot in Modeling Software

Developers of hydraulic and hydrologic modeling software have recently unveiled exciting new program updates and products to increase the efficiency and effectiveness. Dramatic decreases in model run times, thoughtful assembly of multiple information sources, and greater flexibility within hydrologic connectivity options demonstrate just a few ways these changes have improved

This Lawsuit Could Happen to You

This Lawsuit Could Happen to You

A recent news item highlights once again the dangers much of our stormwater infrastructure can present—and the responsibility we have to protect people from it and, sometimes, from themselves.

A family in Pennsylvania has filed a lawsuit against Radnor Township for injuries their son suffered five years ago as a

Stopping Erosion Flat Out

Stopping Erosion Flat Out

Twenty years ago my brother and I started out as small excavating and general contractors,” says Chauncey Webster, president of East Coast Green Inc., in St. Thomas, PA. “Gradually we leaned more and more toward erosion control work.”

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