Tag: water recycling

Reclaimed water or recycled water, is former wastewater (sewage) that is treated to remove solids and impurities, and used in sustainable landscaping irrigation, to recharge groundwater aquifers, to meet commercial and industrial water needs, and for drinking. The purpose of these processes is water conservation and sustainability, rather than discharging the treated water to surface waters such as rivers and oceans. In some cases, recycled water can be used for streamflow augmentation to benefit ecosystems and improve aesthetics.

Keep on Trucking

Keep on Trucking

Wheel wash systems are often one of the least recognized landfill structures for ensuring safety, health, and environmental protection. But they are far from being the least important—not that any landfill protective system is unimportant. For a minor capital investment and minimal operating costs, landfill owners and operators can achieve

We’re Drinking Dinosaur Tears

We’re Drinking Dinosaur Tears

Nobody wants to think about it, but all water is essentially recycled—it’s dinosaur tears, a colleague of mine likes to joke. Since most of the water that we drink each day has passed through other humans at some point before it reaches us, why are we so repelled by the

Keeping Dirt Onsite

Keeping Dirt Onsite

The scope of work for BMP Contractors in ­Riverside, CA, has greatly expanded with new construction permit requirements, notes ­company president Doug Sadler.

Project Profile: Energy Storage Integration

Project Profile: Energy Storage Integration

The Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA/Agency) is a regional wastewater treatment agency and wholesale distributor of imported water. The Agency is responsible for serving approximately 875,000 people over 242 square miles in western San Bernardino County, which is located about 30 miles east of Los Angeles in southern California. The

Report: Direct Potable Reuse

Report: Direct Potable Reuse

In a long-awaited report released in September, the California State Water Resources Board concludes that direct potable reuse (DPR) is technically feasible and promises to begin writing the criteria while research continues. The report stresses the fact that “Well-crafted objective criteria that are unambiguous and enable an objective determination of

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